Amberley Wildbrooks

 An early start in the murk at Amberley this morning rewarded me with the 'Fieldfare Experience', a term I've made up to describe the walk along the Wey South Path just past Middle Gutter which, at this time of year, is alive with the sight and sound of Fieldfares as they flush from the bushes, circle overhead calling noisily and settle again further along, only to repeat the process as again as I head further along. There was at least a couple of hundred today with a few Starling and Redwing about too. On the field under the castle there were Wigeon, Teal, a couple of Egyptian Geese and 5 Black-tailed Godwits. On the walk to the wet wood Ravens were heard overhead and Meadow Pipits called as the flushed from the wet fields. Through the wet wood and to the other side a single Snipe flushed, calling as it went, and a Mistle Thrush landed in a tree and gave a burst of song. A huge flock of Lapwing were in the sky over Rackham, about 400 hundred strong. I walked back over the wooden bridge and was pretty sure there was a Chiffchaff in a tree with some Blue Tits, but it was too quick to get decent views. A few Chaffinch and at least 2 Lesser Redpolls called overhead as I emerged again from the wood. There were very few raptors around, just a few Buzzards and Kestrels. There's still no sign of any owls, which may be due to the lack of rodents after the flooding last winter. I walked back through Fieldfare wood, again being entertained by the birds moving around noisily in the trees around me and coming down to the puddles to drink and bathe. I also noted a few Bullfinch around. Under the castle now were at least 5 Grey Herons, 5 Mute Swans, and a large flock of Black-headed Gulls, with probably one or two Common Gulls amongst them. 

Amberley Wildbrooks

Mistle Thrush


Mistle Thrush


Stonechat

Fieldfare

Fieldfare


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